First Year in Nursing-What should you buy?

So here I am 20 years and thousands of dollars later. Why didn’t someone tell me I did not need to buy all of that stuff? Honestly, I’ve spent thousands of dollars on different stethoscopes, the latest cute scrubs, designer nursing shoes, nursing bags, the list goes on and on. So here are the things you really need for your first year of nursing:

1. Nursing bag: One good sturdy bag can last a long time. I happen to have 15 of them. However, you can actually get this bag free by attending nursing conferences. A two for one deal: you’ll get CEU’s and a free bag. Can’t beat it!

2. A sturdy pair of scissors and a pair of hemostats: These are hot items so make sure you put your name on them. I have lost a few hundred pair in my time.
3. The latest drug book: This is probably one of the best investments you will make. Remember, instead of buying the latest version every year, stay connected to the publisher so that you can get updates on newly added drugs.

4. Uniforms: Instead of all those fancy do-dads, purchase the least expensive scrubs. But wait, before you purchase any scrubs make sure the facility you will be working for does not require a certain uniform. Many facilities are becoming standardized with their uniforms so that healthcare professionals can be easily identifiable.
5. Clip board: I have several. However, my favorite, which is still in heavy rotation today, is the one I found at the dollar store. I have every lab value, IV calculation, and computer password I’ve collected over my 13 years, written all over it!

6. Stethoscope: This is my most expensive piece of nursing equipment and the best investment I’ve ever made. My Littmann Stethoscope has been there through thick and thin. Purchase a high quality stethoscope, one time, and it will help you make it through every area in nursing. I never leave home without it!

These are essential items needed to survive the first year in nursing. You only need to purchase them once and you’re done!

Nursing students can save a lot of money by purchasing these items while in nursing school. It will help the student prepare for real-world experiences. The student will be able to use these items while practicing in nursing school which will make them more comfortable when they begin their first job.

Students may want to purchase a pen light and a good watch, which is required in most nursing programs. Student may also be preparing to take their NCLEX so purchasing a good review book may also be helpful.

Research shows that new nurses are overwhelmed their first year out and they experience feelings of incompetence. So reducing the anxiety by being prepared can prove to be priceless. New graduates should be able to focus on skills and getting acclimated to the wonderful profession. Worrying about what to buy should be last.

Welcome to Nursing First

For any healthcare professional or single mom looking to add wealth and abundance to their current situation boy to I have something for you. The Nursing Business Bootcamp is coming soon and it will be offered as an online course. That’s right, you will be able to start, grow, or cultivate your business all for the comforts of your own home. This course will be transformational!

We have taken difficult business concepts and made them simple and easy to understand. We have created a powerful “how to guide” for anyone to follow. The course will be easy, convenient, and most of all affordable!

More details coming soon……

For more details email us at: nursingfirst.sylette@gmail.com

 

 

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Physical Assessment

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

In this nursing simulation scenario, the RN performs a hospital admission physical assessment. This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(Youtube.Com)

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Postpartum Hemorrhage

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(YouTube.Com)

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Eating Disorder

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(Youtube.Com)

Why you should look forward to the bad days in nursing school (REALLY!)

Scrubsmag.Com
A Nurse’s Guide to Good Living
By: Sean Dent
http://scrubsmag.com/why-you-should-look-forward-to-the-bad-days-in-nursing-school-really/

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Nursing school is a tough cookie. Just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, someone or something throws you that curve ball.

I always find it interesting to hear the “war stories” from current and previous students. The quality of the story stems from the description of how they were treated by the instructor and preceptor, or the staff nurses, or the physicians, or maybe even their fellow nursing students. The story is given a thumbs up or a thumbs down as a conglomeration of how the experience panned out for them.

If the preceptor was mean, then it was a bad day. If the physician was friendly and a good mentor, then it was a good day. So on and so forth.

Here’s the rub. A good day does not always equal a good learning experience. And a bad day does not always mean a failed learning experience. Remember, you are not there to have “fun;” you are there to learn.

Just because your preceptor was a jaded, burned out staff nurse doesn’t mean they didn’t pass on some important pearls of wisdom for you to take with you when you move through your career. And just because the physician was friendly and made attempts to educate or teach you doesn’t mean it will translate into important information at the bedside.

For me personally, the worst days I’d had as a student have taught me the most. I learned invaluable information from bad experiences, bad people and bad situations. I learned a great deal about myself, the type of nurse I want to be and the subset of skills I strive to possess.

Don’t hope for the “easy street” every day when you’re in class or at clinicals. You need to be challenged, you need to be stressed and you need to navigate through the badness. The badness is something that never goes away once you become a nurse. It will test your mettle when you least expect it.

If you get to experience the badness while you are a student, you will be that much more prepared to take it head-on when it shows up later in your career.

Some of the worst experiences will teach us the most. Any experience, whether good or bad, will teach you something. Be sure to pay attention.

“Don’t ask for a lighter load, ask for a stronger back” (adapted from Phillips Brooks).

Do you agree? Have your worst days at school or on the job taught you the most?

Nursing Simulation Scenario: Stress & Crisis

By: Montgomery College
http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/EDU/

This video is one in a series of nursing simulation scenarios created to educate nursing students and refresh new practicing nurses about situations they could encounter in practice in a simulated context. Complete information about this scenario, from set-up to debriefing questions, can be found at http://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/edu/department.aspx?id=8522 ~(Youtube.Com)